Japan Australia Pages

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Accommodation in Japan

Japan offers a wide range of accommodation from the budget to the high-end luxury. You can find accommodation in either Japanese style or Western style. In Japan there is a person rate per room, which means if you are sharing a room with another person the rate will double.

In most hotels and all ryokan (Japanese style inns) you will be provided with a yukata robe, toothbrush, razor, show cap and basic toiletries.

The main types of accommodation in Japan include:

Western Style Hotels
Western style hotels can be found all over Japan and include both international and Japanese hotel chains. They usually have English speaking staff with rates vary from 8,000 yen to 30,000 yen.

Budget Style Business Hotels
A great compromise and very economical with prices around 7,400 yen for a single and 9,000 yen for a double. The rooms are clean, simple, western style and usually include free breakfast, TV, and internet connection in your room. The hotels are usually located close to train stations making them very convenient for travel. Popular chains include Toyoko Inn and APA Hotel.

Capsule Hotels
A cheap alternative to regular hotels and very common in the major cities. The rooms usually measure two metres by one metre by one metre, and contain a bed, a TV, reading light, radio and alarm clock. You can keep your personal belongings stored safely in a locker room. A lot of capsule hotels also offer access to sauna and communal baths. The average price is usually around 3,800 yen per night.

Minshuku (Japanese Guest Houses)
These are usually small, family run bed and breakfast lodgings without the frills such as yukata gowns and toiletries. A stay at a minshuku will give you a more intimate experience of Japanese home life. Rates are usually from 5,000 yen and up and they can be found all over Japan.

Ryokan (Japanese Style Inns)
A rewarding experience for a taste of traditional Japan. They charge on average a rate of around 9,000 yen per person, but can rapidly rise for the more elegant ryokan. Guests sleep in tatami (straw mat) rooms on futon and the morning and evening meals are served in the guest’s room. The baths are sometimes communal.

For more information on different types of accommodation in Japan and places to visit, pick up a copy of Lonely Planet Japan


14 comments:

  1. I find that even the cheap budget hotels; in Japan - you are and will be guaranteed of a really good level of cleanliness. ;)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Lina, Yes they are usually very clean which is quite common in Japan and the level of service is fantastic :)

      John

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  2. I want to add also:

    If one decides to stay at Toyoko Inn, do note that you are not allowed in your room from 10.00am to 4.00pm (or 3.00pm if you are a member) because that's the time they clean ALL the rooms. It's for security.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Lina, Great info there. I gotta do a post about the Toyoko Inn one of these days. Will be staying in one in Tokyo in January. Is it worth being a member?

      John

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    2. Totally.

      20% discount on Sundays and public holidays.
      5% discount on weekdays.
      Bonus point on certain days.
      And if you accumulate enough nights, you can redeem for free nights.
      What's not to like?

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    3. Sounds like a pretty good deal to me, Lina. Got to get myself signed up :)

      John

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    4. And nowadays, at selected branches you can get another 5% off if you select for eco room which is a plan where they don't clean your room daily.

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    5. Makes sense. Definitely worth it if you are staying a few days and are reasonably clean :)

      John

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  3. Hi John,
    another type of accommodation we have tried and really enjoyed in Japan is renting a house (we rented ours in Kyoto through Japan Experience which is actually a French company who only recently opened up to Australians - they have a really informative website so you can see all about the house before you rent). It was really good because we were greeted by a local (who spoke English) so we could ask lots of questions and get lots of good advice as to what to do in the area. It was lovely to experience living in a Japanese neighbourhood for a few days and be able to relax by ourselves for a little while.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks rObfOs, Yes, they are a great idea if you are thinking about being in Japan for an extended stay.

      John

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  4. And if you're lucky enough to have family in Japan, there's always room for an extra futon, even if it has to be on the balcony next to the washing machine! :)

    I agree with Lina: even cheap hotels are usually clean and usually have great service.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Rurousha, The family are always a great help, especially for those longer stays. Yeah, we usually stay at one of the budget hotel chains when we travel and have been extremely satisfied. Don't mind the odd stay at a ryokan for those special occasions :)

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  5. Nice post. Many people can understand the kind of accomadation.
    I like Ryokan a lot because I like Japanese dish. :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Cocomino, Appreciate the positive feedback. I love the tradition setting of a ryokan, too. Some of them have amazing onsen and the traditional Japanese food they serve is worth the stay alone :)

      John

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